Tea master – Ideals House http://ideals-house.com/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 11:52:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ideals-house.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Tea master – Ideals House http://ideals-house.com/ 32 32 Master Data Management Mdm Market Status in US, Europe & Apac Analysis by 2022-2030 – Indian Defense News https://ideals-house.com/master-data-management-mdm-market-status-in-us-europe-apac-analysis-by-2022-2030-indian-defense-news/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 17:07:28 +0000 https://ideals-house.com/master-data-management-mdm-market-status-in-us-europe-apac-analysis-by-2022-2030-indian-defense-news/ Master Data Management Mdm Market Report Coverage: Key Growth Drivers and Challenges, Regional Segmentation and Outlook, Key Industry Trends and Opportunities, Competitive Analysis, COVID-19[feminine] Impact analysis and projected recovery, and market sizing and forecasting. Latest research launched on Global Master Data Management Market Mdm, it provides a detailed analysis with presentable graphs, charts and […]]]>

Master Data Management Mdm Market Report Coverage: Key Growth Drivers and Challenges, Regional Segmentation and Outlook, Key Industry Trends and Opportunities, Competitive Analysis, COVID-19[feminine] Impact analysis and projected recovery, and market sizing and forecasting.

Latest research launched on Global Master Data Management Market Mdm, it provides a detailed analysis with presentable graphs, charts and tables. This report covers an in-depth study of the Master Data Management Mdm Market size, growth and share, trends, consumption, segments, application and forecast 2030. With qualitative and quantitative analysis, we help you with deep and comprehensive research on the Global Master Data Management Mdm Market. This report has been prepared by experienced and knowledgeable market analysts and researchers. Each section of the research study is specially prepared to explore key aspects of the global Master Data Management Mdm Market. Buyers of the report will have access to accurate information PESTLE, SWOT and other types of analysis on the global Master Data Management Mdm market. In addition, it offers very precise estimates on the CAGR, market share and market size of key regions and countries.

Major Key Players profiled in the report include:
SAP, Oracle, IBM, Informatica, Stibo Systems, TIBCO Software, Riversand Technologies, Orchestra Networks, EnterWorks, Magnitude, Talend, SAS Institute, Microsoft, KPMG, Teradata Corporation, Software AG, Agility Multichannel, VisionWare, SupplyOn AG, Sunway World, Yonyou

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Segmental analysis:
The report categorized the global Master Data Management Mdm market into segments comprising product type and application. Each segment is assessed based on its share and growth rate. Besides, the analysts have studied the potential regions which could prove valuable for Master Data Management Mdm manufacturers in the coming years. The regional analysis includes reliable predictions about value and volume, helping market players to gain in-depth insights regarding the entire Master Data Management Mdm industry.

Market is split by Type, can be split into:
Customer data, product data, other

The market is split by Application, can be split into:
Banking, Finance and Insurance (BFSI), IT and Telecommunications, Government and Healthcare, Manufacturing and Logistics, Others

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The report authors have analyzed the developing and developed regions considered for research and analysis of the global Master Data Management Mdm Market. The regional analysis section of the report provides an in-depth study of different regional and country-level Mdm Reference Data Management industries to help players plan effective expansion strategies.

Regions Covered in Global Master Data Management Mdm Market:
The Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)
North America (United States, Mexico and Canada)
South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, etc.)
Europe (Turkey, Germany, Russia UK, Italy, France, etc.)
Asia Pacific (Vietnam, China, Malaysia, Japan, Philippines, Korea, Thailand, India, Indonesia and Australia)

Years Considered to Estimate Market Size:
Historical year: 2019-2020
Year of reference : 2021
Estimated year: 2022
Forecast year: 2022-2030

Detailed TOC of Master Data Management Mdm Market Report 2022-2030:
Chapter 1: Master Data Management Mdm Market Overview
Chapter 2: Economic impact on industry
Chapter 3: Market competition by manufacturers
Chapter 4: Production, revenue (value) by region
Chapter 5: Supply (production), consumption, export, import by regions
Chapter 6: Production, Revenue (Value), Price Trend by Type
Chapter 7: Market analysis by application
Chapter 8: Manufacturing cost analysis
Chapter 9: Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers
Chapter 10: Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders
Chapter 11: Analysis of market effect factors
Chapter 12: Master Data Management Market Mdm Provide
Continued……

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What market dynamics does this report cover?
The report shares key information on:
Current market size
Market forecasts
Market opportunities
Main Drivers and Constraints
Regulatory scenario
Industry trend
New product approvals/launch
Promotion and marketing initiatives
Price analysis
Competitive landscape
It helps companies make strategic decisions.

Does this report offer customization?
Personalization helps organizations better understand specific market segments and areas of interest. Therefore,
Market strides provides customized reporting information based on business needs for mission-critical calls.

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Ask the master gardener: why isn’t my plant growing? – Brainerd Expedition https://ideals-house.com/ask-the-master-gardener-why-isnt-my-plant-growing-brainerd-expedition/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://ideals-house.com/ask-the-master-gardener-why-isnt-my-plant-growing-brainerd-expedition/ Dear Master Gardener: I bought a Mandevilla to mount my obelisk but it doesn’t. A friend bought a Dipladenia and they look alike. Is it the same plant with different names? Why is my plant not vine? Answer: Mandevilla and Dipladenia look very similar and are sometimes sold as the same thing, but they have […]]]>

Dear Master Gardener: I bought a Mandevilla to mount my obelisk but it doesn’t. A friend bought a Dipladenia and they look alike. Is it the same plant with different names? Why is my plant not vine?

Answer: Mandevilla and Dipladenia look very similar and are sometimes sold as the same thing, but they have different growth habits. Mandevilla is a vine and Dipladenia is more like a shrub. The flowers and leaves of Dipladenia are smaller than Mandevilla, more pointed and slightly shiny.

Mandevilla is a vine and needs a structure to climb. The shrub-like Dipladenia is ideal as a filler plant in a container. When you go to the garden center, be sure to choose the right plant because one can be labeled as the other. Since the plant you purchased to climb your obelisk is non-climbing and remains shrub-like, you likely got a Dipladenia rather than the intended Mandevilla.

The shrubby Dipladenia is ideal as a filler plant in a container.

Contributed / Jennifer Knutson

Dear Master Gardener: Cutworms are decimating transplants and seedlings in my vegetable garden. Can I do something?

Answer: There are different species of cutworms, but they are all similar in general appearance. They are smooth with very few hairs and measure about two inches when fully grown. Cutworms vary in color between brown, tan, pink, green, gray or black. They usually curl into a tight C-shape when disturbed.

Common vegetables they attack are asparagus, beans, cabbage, carrots, celery, corn, lettuce, peas, peppers, potatoes, and tomatoes. Cutworms feed in the evening or at night and hide in plant debris during the day. New grafts, young plants and seedlings are the most susceptible to cutworm damage because their stems are softer.

Cutworms wrap their bodies around the stem and feed on it, causing the plant to cut just above the soil surface. Cutworm numbers can vary from year to year and when their numbers are high they can cause serious damage to a garden.

The use of pesticides in the vegetable garden is not necessary. When you see them in your garden, pick them up and drop them in a container of soapy water or crush them. Remove all plant debris from your garden to reduce egg-laying sites. Remove weeds, which can also serve as a host for young cutworm larvae.

You can also make a collar out of stiff paper, cardboard, aluminum foil or a tin can and place it around the stem of the plant. Push the collars into the ground about an inch or 2 inches. This will create a physical barrier to prevent cutworm larvae from feeding on the plants.

Dear Master Gardener: I’ve seen Annabelle hydrangea flowers used as wedding cake toppers. Is it just a decoration or is it edible? Which flowers are edible?

Answer: Edible flowers are often used as a garnish. However, not all flowers are edible. Hydrangea flowers are sometimes used as a cake decoration, which might make you think they are edible, but they are not! Hydrangea flowers contain low levels of cyanide.

It is important to only choose flowers that are safe to eat and have not been treated with pesticides. Part of a plant is safe to eat, but don’t assume all parts are safe – it’s usually the petals of the flower that are edible. The flowers of herbs usually taste the same as the leaves.

Here is a U of M list of some edible flowers:

  • Strawberry from the Alps (the flowers taste like strawberries, the leaves are used for tea),
  • Anise hyssop (flowers and leaves have licorice flavor, used in tea),
  • Apple or plum (flowers are sweet with a sweet floral flavor, use candied or as a garnish),
  • Single buds (flowers have a delicate spicy-sweet flavor, eaten fresh or dried for tea),
  • Calendula (petals are a slightly bitter substitute for saffron, more for color than flavor),
  • Daylily (flower bud flavor compares to green beans and eggplant, but open flower flavor is milder, flavor varies by cultivar),
  • Hibiscus (tropical) (flowers have a slight cranberry-citrus flavor, used in teas),
  • Nasturtium (flowers and leaves have a peppery taste, use them fresh in salads for a spicy flavor),
  • Pansy (the flowers have a green, herbaceous flavor),
  • Roses (Dianthus) (flowers have a sweet clove flavor, remove the base of the petal – usually white in color – it’s usually bitter; use in sorbets, cold drinks, salads with fruit),
  • Rose (use petals but remove the white base of the petal; use rose hips for tea and dressing),
  • Scented geranium (the flavors of the flowers vary according to the varieties; flowers and leaves perfume jellies, sugar, butter, cakes, tea, honey),
  • Tuberous begonia (the flower petals have a tart citrus flavor),
  • Tulip (the flower petals have a pea or bean flavor, remove them from the stem and use them in salads).

Dear Master Gardener: Does an American charm grow in Minnesota?

Answer: Yes! Blue Beech (Carpinus caroliniana), also known as American Hornbeam, is a wonderful small ornamental tree native to Minnesota. It is one of the few landscape trees that grows well in full shade. Blue Beech can be grown as a tall shrub, a single-stemmed tree, or a multi-stemmed tree. It offers multi-season interest.

The pendulous, pagoda-shaped seed heads are bright green and contrast nicely with the summer foliage; then they ripen to brown and cling to the tree over winter. The smooth, bluish-gray ornamental trunks are an eye-catcher in the winter landscape.

Fall color is spectacular with shades ranging from yellow and orange to scarlet – often all on the same tree. The seeds are a source of food for songbirds.

You can get your garden questions answered by calling the new Master Gardener Helpline at 218-824-1068 and leaving a message. A master gardener will call you back. Or, email me at umnmastergardener@gmail.com and I’ll reply in the column if space permits.

The University of Minnesota Extension Master Gardeners are trained and certified volunteers for the University of Minnesota Extension. The information provided in this column is based on academic research.

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Visit the Kane County Master Gardener’s Idea Garden this summer https://ideals-house.com/visit-the-kane-county-master-gardeners-idea-garden-this-summer/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 18:31:12 +0000 https://ideals-house.com/visit-the-kane-county-master-gardeners-idea-garden-this-summer/ Discover inspiring ways to grow native vegetables, fruits, flowers, herbs and plants at the Kane County Master Gardener Idea Garden in St. Charles. Trained volunteers at the University of Illinois Extension will host three summer open houses to share growing ideas and expertise. Visitors are invited to visit the garden from 9 a.m. to 11 […]]]>

Discover inspiring ways to grow native vegetables, fruits, flowers, herbs and plants at the Kane County Master Gardener Idea Garden in St. Charles. Trained volunteers at the University of Illinois Extension will host three summer open houses to share growing ideas and expertise.

Visitors are invited to visit the garden from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Saturdays June 18 and July 16 and Tuesday August 9.

Master gardeners will also be available for questions and discussions.

“The Idea Garden is back this year, and once again it features innovative gardening methods and fun designs that are easy to replicate at home,” said Sarah Fellerer, Kane County Master Gardener Program Coordinator. “Some new features include a Hugelkulter style bed, a host plant garden of black swallowtail butterflies, native plant patches for sun and shade conditions, small pumpkins and fruit patches with goji berries, sea ​​berries, rhubarb and raspberries.”

There are also a variety of themed gardens, such as fairy, tea, Victorian, English cottage and even one designed to feed guinea pigs.

“This year we also have unique projects involving tomatoes, including a patch planted with seeds that have been in space, and another with a heirloom variety with a rich history and Chicagoland ties,” added Fellerer.

The “Space” seeds spent five years in orbit around Earth before returning home with the shuttle Columbia in 1989. In 1990, schools across the country grew the special seeds as part of a grand science experiment , and recently Kane County Master Gardeners found a leftover kit. from that experience and started planting tomato seedlings that are now growing in the idea garden.

The second unique tomato patch features the Inciardi Dough Tomato, which has also taken a historic journey.

“It was brought from Sicily to America by the Inciardi family, who sewed the seed into their clothes so they wouldn’t be confiscated at Ellis Island,” Fellerer said. “Henry Inciardi settled in Chicago, worked for General Electric, and survived the tragic disaster in Eastland. His family continued to cultivate the seeds for decades until they nearly died out.”


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

However, the variety was brought back by a handful of local gardeners who continued to grow and save the seeds. Today it is grown almost exclusively in the Chicago area.

The Idea Garden is located at 3480 Lincoln Hwy. (Route 38), at the intersection with Peck Road, in St Charles. Visitors enter via the Route 38 driveway. Follow the evolution of the idea garden on www.facebook.com/KaneMGIdeaGarden.

If a reasonable accommodation is required to participate, contact fellerer@illinois.edu or call (630) 584-6166. Advance requests are strongly encouraged to allow sufficient time to meet your access needs.

Help desk open

Do you have questions about your garden, lawn or trees?

The University of Illinois Extension Master Gardeners also host a Seasonal Helpline at (630) 584-6166, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday, or by email at uiemg- kane@illinois.edu.

For more information, visit go.illinois.edu/HelpDeskMGdkk.

]]> Ask the Master Gardener: Tips for Harvesting Rhubarb – Brainerd Dispatch https://ideals-house.com/ask-the-master-gardener-tips-for-harvesting-rhubarb-brainerd-dispatch/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://ideals-house.com/ask-the-master-gardener-tips-for-harvesting-rhubarb-brainerd-dispatch/ Dear Master Gardener: What is the best way to harvest rhubarb? Also, my neighbor told me that if my rhubarb has a flower, I’m supposed to break it off and I’m not supposed to pick and eat rhubarb after mid-July. Why? Answer: Start picking rhubarb stalks as soon as they have reached their full length. […]]]>

Dear Master Gardener: What is the best way to harvest rhubarb? Also, my neighbor told me that if my rhubarb has a flower, I’m supposed to break it off and I’m not supposed to pick and eat rhubarb after mid-July. Why?

Answer: Start picking rhubarb stalks as soon as they have reached their full length. Each variety is different and can vary approximately 1 to 2 feet in length. Hold the rod firmly, pull and twist. Immediately after harvesting, use a knife to cut the leaves from the stem. They are poisonous and leaving them on can cause the stems to wilt faster. The rhubarb harvest season lasts until the end of June. After this time, let the plant keep all of its leaves to build up energy for next year. It’s a common myth that the whole plant becomes poisonous later in the summer, but that’s not true. If you want to pull out a few stems occasionally later in the summer to prepare a dish, you won’t harm the vigor or health of the plant. The rods can however be harder.

Your neighbor is right about a flower stalk emerging from the plant. Cut it as soon as you see it. If the plant flowers and produces seeds, it will waste energy which should be stored for the next year’s harvest.

Dear Master Gardener: I would like to grow hollyhocks. Can I start them from seed right now?

Answer: Hollyhocks are those old-fashioned flowers our grandmothers used to grow and lately there has been a resurgence of interest in growing them. Like foxgloves, most old-fashioned hollyhocks are biennial, meaning they complete their life cycle in two years. First year growth results in a rosette of leaves near the ground. Growth in the second year results in stem growth, flowering and seed set, followed by plant death. Gardeners who grow hollyhocks often allow some of the plants to go to seed in order to get new plants each year. Some newer varieties are considered perennials, but they may not live more than a few years. If you cut the flowers right after they bloom so they don’t set seed, this will give the plants a better chance of coming back.

If you start hollyhocks from seed this year, you probably won’t see flowers until next year, and then they will most likely die. If you want flowers this year, you might want to get potted plants from a local garden center. Then let some plants drop seeds to get more plants in the future. Plant them in a sunny location and space them 12 to 18 inches apart.

Dear Master Gardener: Is it morel season? Where am I looking for them?

Answer: The morel is prized for culinary use and is probably the most recognizable and sought after edible mushroom. Morels usually emerge in the spring when there is sufficient rainfall. In southern Minnesota they can be found from late April through May and in northern Minnesota they can be found through June. Morels are most commonly found in woods or edges of woods. There is a common myth that they only grow near dead elm trees, but you can also find morels growing under or around rotting ash, oak, maple, poplar, and apple trees. It is crucial that you positively identify the mushrooms you pick and eat as there are poisonous look-alikes and some can be deadly. Here’s an old adage of mushroom pickers that’s good to follow: “When in doubt, throw it out.”

Dear Master Gardener: I would like to introduce my 5 and 7 year old children to gardening this year. Are there any books for kids this age that can teach them the basics of gardening at their level?

Answer: Yes, and what a great idea! Reading aloud to children is proven by research to help them develop a larger vocabulary, provide a fluent reading pattern, and encourage reading for enjoyment. Reading gardening books aloud to children can be beneficial for starting conversations about gardening. That’s actually how I started my love of gardening – my grandfather gave me a children’s book about flowers at a young age and then guided me through his flower gardens by taking me there. learning the names of flowers and telling me facts about them.

“From Seed to Plant” by Gail Gibbons is a wonderful resource with beautiful drawings that introduces elementary-aged children to the relationship between seeds and plants. “How a Seed Grows” by Helene Jordan helps children understand the difference between various seeds and how they grow into trees, fruits and vegetables. “A Seed is Sleepy” by Dianna Aston and Sylvia Long is a beautiful book that introduces children to fascinating facts about seeds and plants. Jerry Pallotta’s “The Flower Alphabet Book” not only introduces readers to different flowers, but works on unfamiliar letter sounds and pronunciation that children may not be familiar with before. There is also interesting information such as which flower is used to make a doll, which flower flavors the tea, and which flower growers feed the chickens.

Dear Master Gardener: What’s new on jumping worms?

Answer: Unfortunately, there are jumping worms in Minnesota. And, unfortunately, the jumping worms spread throughout the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum because they inadvertently used wood chips from an infected pile all over their garden beds, walking paths, and trees.

Jumping worms are an invasive species that move like a snake and sometimes appear to jump. It is identifiable by a flat, light-colored ring that extends around its body. They and their eggs can be distributed in commercial mulch or from community compost piles. They are able to survive in shredded pine, cedar and spruce mulch and have often been seen in mulched garden beds. No earthworm is native to Minnesota. Jumping worms are native to Asia and spread by moving potted plants, soil, compost, mulch, and fishing bait. They are able to quickly infest gardens and forest soils and will turn topsoil and mulch into dry, gritty granules that look like coffee grounds. They remove important nutrients from the topsoil, which, combined with the lack of an organic layer, kills weak plants and increases erosion. This means that invasive species like buckthorn can completely overrun an affected area. If your soil looks like coffee grounds and you find unusually active worms in your mulch, you may have jumping worms. Report any suspected jumpers to the DNR. Remove them and destroy them if you see them by sealing them in a bag and throwing it in the trash.

You can get your garden questions answered by calling the new Master Gardener Helpline at 218-824-1068 and leaving a message. A master gardener will call you back. Or, email me at umnmastergardener@gmail.com and I’ll reply in the column if space permits.

The University of Minnesota Extension Master Gardeners are trained and certified volunteers for the University of Minnesota Extension. The information provided in this column is based on academic research.

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Opera Screening at NCPA, Mumbai, Baking Masterclass, and More…Top Picks of the Week https://ideals-house.com/opera-screening-at-ncpa-mumbai-baking-masterclass-and-more-top-picks-of-the-week/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 08:06:43 +0000 https://ideals-house.com/opera-screening-at-ncpa-mumbai-baking-masterclass-and-more-top-picks-of-the-week/ Opera session: Turandot Sung in Italian with English subtitles, Turandot is a love story set in China. It is the swan song of Puccini, who died before it was completed. The story revolves around Princess Turandot and her marriage. The condition of the marriage is as follows: the princess will choose a suitor of royal […]]]>

Opera session: Turandot

Sung in Italian with English subtitles, Turandot is a love story set in China. It is the swan song of Puccini, who died before it was completed. The story revolves around Princess Turandot and her marriage. The condition of the marriage is as follows: the princess will choose a suitor of royal blood who will answer three riddles posed by her. However, suitors who do not respond will be executed. An unknown prince in love with the princess solves all the puzzles posed by the princess, but she is reluctant to marry him. The tables turn when the prince offers him a way out: learn his name before dawn, then he will die. But does he? Watch this thrilling opera to find out more.

When: June 16, 6 p.m.

Where: Godrej Dance Theatre, NCPA, Nariman Point, Mumbai

Attend: Pastry Masterclass

If you love to cook or want to brush up on your baking skills, this online course is for you. The instructor, Chef Pooja, will guide you through every step of cooking and help you understand the smallest aspects. The course covers baking techniques, making biscuits, bread and tea cakes. The class will teach you how to cook from scratch. Language: English and Hindi.

When: June 13, 1:45 p.m.

To register, go to: bookmyshow.com

Well-Being: Five Steps to Overcoming Worry and Anxiety

Stress affects all aspects of our professional and personal lives. It decreases cognitive function, increases dangerous risk taking, and shuts down higher brain function. So it’s important to understand that stress isn’t the problem – our reaction to it is…and we can learn to control it. With this on-demand video course, you will learn to recognize stress and heal yourself. It will also teach you five scientifically proven stress management techniques.

To register, visit: insider.in

Documentary: Sharkwater Extinction

This thrilling documentary follows filmmaker Rob Stewart as he exposes the illegal billion-dollar shark fin industry. As he recounts real-life examples, he faces the political corruption propagated by influential criminal organizations.

Where to watch: Amazon Prime Video

Library: Maybe Someday by Colleen Hoover

Sydney leads a perfect life: she is a student with a stable job on the side, lives with her best friend and has a great boyfriend. Sydney’s bubble bursts when she catches her boyfriend cheating on her with her best friend. His world is collapsing. In the midst of the drama, she meets Ridge who gives her hope that she can move on. But can she? Or does she want? The passionate story of love, music and betrayal draws you in from the first page and keeps you hooked until the last word.

Madhubani Workshop: Indian Folk Art

Connect with your cultural roots in a fun workshop. Madhubani is a traditional Indian art form originating from Bihar. It is known for its vibrant colors and unique borders. Take part in a relaxing art session. The workshop is also suitable for beginners. Through the workshop, you will learn about the history and origin of Madhubani painting, patterns and border styles used in Madhubani. Book lovers have the opportunity to create unique bookmarks using the patterns and borders.

Materials needed:

A4 paper (150- 200gsm)

Fineliner or cd marker (black)

Posters/acrylic paintings

Brush (round 1, 3)

Basic stationery

When: June 12, 3 p.m.

To register, visit: insider.in

(To receive our daily E-paper on WhatsApp, please Click here. To receive it on Telegram, please Click here. We allow the PDF of the document to be shared on WhatsApp and other social media platforms.)


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Master Gardeners: Vegetable Gardening Basics, Part 2 | Explore Yakima https://ideals-house.com/master-gardeners-vegetable-gardening-basics-part-2-explore-yakima/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://ideals-house.com/master-gardeners-vegetable-gardening-basics-part-2-explore-yakima/ This is the second in a two-part series on vegetable garden basics. This article goes into more detail on how to get the most out of your gardening experience. To read Part 1, pick up the May 29 edition of the Yakima Herald-Republic or go to bit.ly/YHR-GardenBasics1. good soil It is the most important ingredient […]]]>

This is the second in a two-part series on vegetable garden basics. This article goes into more detail on how to get the most out of your gardening experience. To read Part 1, pick up the May 29 edition of the Yakima Herald-Republic or go to bit.ly/YHR-GardenBasics1.

good soil

It is the most important ingredient of a good vegetable garden – good soil is essential! Here’s how to get it:

Evaluate the type of native soil you have; is it clay, silt or sand? You need to know where to start in order to know how to get the best soil for your vegetables.

Assess acid to alkaline pH; The pH is best between 6.2 and 6.8. The Maître Jardinier clinic can perform a soil analysis for you.

Use amendments to adjust the original soil using things like aged steer manure and limestone for alkaline soils (many soils in eastern Washington are alkaline).

There is a definite need for plenty of organic matter to improve garden soil, as it holds nutrients better and makes the soil more porous.

You can buy commercial compost, steer manure or topsoil by truck. Or you can make your own compost; it’s a great way to recycle garden and yard waste.

The key is to balance food, water, and air to promote the growth of thermophilic microorganisms that will break down the ingredients into rich soil.

The basics of compost

Have your compost area near the garden. The container should be a 3-sided structure of wood, straw bales, fencing, or can even be an open pile.

Make the pile using a 1:2 ratio of green and brown materials. Green equals nitrogen or energy sources needed for rapid microbial growth, such as grass clippings, chicken or cow manure, yard waste, and coffee grounds. Brown equates to carbon sources or bulking agents needed to aerate the compost pile, such as straw, sawdust, wood chips, and corn stalks.

Use balanced agents, which have both energy and bulking agent properties, including deciduous leaves, horse manure, and shrub trimmings (a chipper to reduce size is best).

Layer the above items, adding a shovel full of soil between the layers, which adds the microbes needed for decomposition.

The compost pile should be 3 feet high by 3 feet wide by 3 feet deep when complete.

Keep the pile moist but not soggy.

For quick compost, turn the pile twice a week with a pitchfork, as it needs oxygen. The pile heats up in the center to 120 to 150 degrees and will shrink and turn brown and crumbly in four to six weeks.

If you want slower composting, don’t turn it as often and it can take three to four months.

When finished, sift the soil 1/2 inch to remove large chunks.

Apply as a side dressing to plants or work into the top 3-4 inches of soil.

Plant the garden

It’s a no-brainer, but it’s important to only select seeds and plants that you or your family like to eat.

Start indoors from seed in early spring if you want to kick off the season.

You can also choose to use season extenders such as cold frames, a water wall, cloches, or gallon cut milk jugs with caps to cover the plants.

Plant cool weather crops outdoors after the last frost date (May 1-15). You can pre-germinate larger seeds by using a damp paper towel in a plastic bag and picking out seeds that germinate.

Plant warm weather crops when the soil temperature warms up.

For many plants, it is easier to use bedding plants (tomatoes, peppers, squash, cucumbers, melons, etc.). The Master Gardener Plant Sale always takes place around the first weekend in May, and we have an amazing selection of plants at reasonable prices.

Decide how much to plant of each so you know production quantities; Decide how you will use excess products if there are more products than you need.

Plant tall or trellis plants on the north side so they don’t shade shorter plants.

Know the planting depth, planting distance and time to maturity for each plant. It is very important to read the information on the back of the seed packet.

Plant perennial vegetables (for example, rhubarb and asparagus) in a separate spot where they won’t be disturbed and they’ll grow back year after year.

Allow space for sprawling vegetables or place a trellis near the base of the plant.

Label all rows and plants, especially varieties, or create a map of the garden with plant names.

Watering

The water must be constant but adjusted to the weather conditions (the higher the temperature, the more water is needed). More water is needed after planting when they flower and when they fruit.

Basic tenants of watering include a slow, deep watering of 4 to 6 inches, and watering first thing in the morning so the leaves have time to dry.

There are many ways to water which often depend on the style of garden chosen. Row type is best with furrow irrigation or overhead sprinklers. Hand watering is best for containers. Drip irrigation is best for raised beds, but it is expensive and needs to be implemented. Use a soaker hose only if house water is used, as irrigation water clogs the lines.

Fertilization

Keep the microbes happy: “Feed the soil, not the plant” is a good rule of thumb.

There are three important components: Nitrogen (N) is needed for photosynthesis and the growth of stems and leaves; phosphorus (P) is needed for strong roots and crop maturation; and potassium (K) aids in the production of carbohydrates and aids in disease resistance.

Micronutrients include calcium, sulfur, magnesium and iron.

Fertilize every two to three weeks as needed; use a weaker solution more often as opposed to a stronger solution less often.

There are several types of fertilizer; read labels for NPK ratio (eg, 20:5:5). Chemical fertilizers are water soluble. Use nitrogen-rich fertilizers for growth and phosphorus-rich fertilizers for flowering.

Organic options include fish emulsion, dried kelp, and bone or blood meal.

Compost tea is aged horse manure that is put in a burlap sack and soaked in water, then dresses the plants.

Cannabis control

Pull or hoe weeds when the soil is moist and when the weeds are young as they are easier to pull. Older weeds can go to seed, and then you get even more weeds.

The “magic of mulching” has many benefits: it conserves soil water lost through evaporation, it insulates plant roots from extreme cold and hot temperatures, it reduces the need for weeding and the garden looks cleaner. .

Types of mulch include shredded bark, straw, grass clippings, and plastic sheeting.

Place mulch around the plants, but not covering the plant stem, about 4 to 6 inches thick.

Harvest

Find out or check out references when foods are ready to pick or try tasting them until they’re right for you.

Harvesting early in the morning is always better.

The more you pick, the more you will produce.

Enjoy!

Learn from your mistakes and make changes accordingly for next year’s garden. Keeping a garden journal makes this process easier. And remember, the WSU Master Gardener program is here to help if you have any questions. You can also attend our free Saturday class each month in our Heritage Garden at the Greenhouse location.

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Prairie Island Community and Goodhue County Master Gardeners partnership pays off for both parties – Agweek https://ideals-house.com/prairie-island-community-and-goodhue-county-master-gardeners-partnership-pays-off-for-both-parties-agweek/ Tue, 31 May 2022 10:30:53 +0000 https://ideals-house.com/prairie-island-community-and-goodhue-county-master-gardeners-partnership-pays-off-for-both-parties-agweek/ WELCH, Minn. ― The Prairie Island community and the Goodhue County Extension Master Gardeners have been working in partnership since 2018, in what began with site visits to identify insect, disease and weed issues in the Prairie Island Community Elders Medicine Garden. “We came out first to look at some insect disease issues, and we […]]]>

WELCH, Minn. ― The Prairie Island community and the Goodhue County Extension Master Gardeners have been working in partnership since 2018, in what began with site visits to identify insect, disease and weed issues in the Prairie Island Community Elders Medicine Garden.

“We came out first to look at some insect disease issues, and we were so impressed with their gardens,” said Nancy Berlin, master gardener at Goodhue County Extension for 11 years.

The partnership has evolved into so much more, with educational exchanges between Prairie Island community members and master gardeners on traditional wisdom, medicinal uses of plants, food sovereignty and more.

“The partnership we’ve had with the Master Gardeners for the past four years has been a very good relationship between the tribe and the town of Red Wing and Goodhue County,” Staudt said. “Gardeners who come here say all the time how much they appreciate the cultural teachings that take place and how they learn things they have never experienced or thought of before from the tribe – that changes life enough.”

Mikhail Childs, a tribal member of the Prairie Island community and volunteer gardener, said his role in the partnership is simply to learn and share what he has learned from his elders and other community members, as well as employees from the Prairie Island community who were hired to re-educate young people about native plants.

“To re-educate on all the knowledge that has been lost – the knowledge of plants and the knowledge of nature,” Childs said. “I’m just an intermediary, as I learn from master gardeners, which has been a tremendous asset to our community, with their experience and knowledge of plants.”

Childs, who has been a volunteer gardener since 2017, said it’s been great to see the master gardeners react to the plants growing in community gardens on Prairie Island.

“They find it so unique and exciting, because we have all of this, what a lot of people might think of as weed, which we know as medicine,” Childs said. “That’s why I volunteer, because I get so much from the program, and just to be with all the people who share what they know, and all I can hope to do is pass on that knowledge. to anyone willing to listen, and hopefully to the next generation.”

According to a quote from an unnamed member of the Prairie Island Community tribe on the sign outside the Prairie Island Community Elder Medicine Garden, many “Dakota and non-Dakota” people once congregated near Prairie Island and of Red Wing during the growing season, due to the “plethora of medicinal plants” growing in the area.

“If Red Wing was the economic hub of our ancestors’ days, Prairie Island was our pharmacy,” Childs said. “The Isle of Grasslands had just had a glut of different kinds of drugs. And I think that’s what’s unique about our position here is that we get the chance to show how all of these drugs special and rare that could be found on the Isle of Grasslands in the time of our ancestors.”

Childs is able to teach members of the Master Gardener program about native Minnesota plants – such as white sage and sweetgrass – and their traditional medicinal uses.

Sweetgrass is a native Minnesota grass that actively grows from spring through fall. Small yellow flowers bloom in mid-summer after the flower has finished blooming, and dark black seeds cover the plant. Sweetgrass has a sweet vanilla scent.

White sage is a perennial herb that grows on several stems from a slender rhizome and, like sweetgrass, also has a very fragrant aroma.

White sage and sweetgrass are grown on the eagle mound in front of the Prairie Island Elders Community Garden.

“There’s white sage on the head and tail, and then sweetgrass grows on the wings,” said Nicole Staudt, grants coordinator for the Statewide Health Improvement Partnership of the Prairie Island Indian Community, of the mound. of eagle.

Sweetgrass can be plaited, Staudt said, and white sage can be harvested for multiple uses. Both plants are used in different tribal ceremonies, she said, as well as medicinal uses.

“We have a few different drugs that we use for purification, and some of them are used for purification, for cleansing,” Childs said. “Others are used to ward off bad energies, and others are believed to promote or attract good energies.”

Each month before meeting with the Goodhue County Master Gardeners program, Staudt tries to highlight some plants that are native to the season at the time.

This month of May, she highlighted the nettles, which were out, as well as the dandelions with a tea she made for the group.

“We harvested dandelion flowers and then also wild violet flowers which add a nice color to the tea,” she said. “All of these are edible and they make a wonderful tea.”

Nettles serve as an antihistamine, Staudt said.

“Nettles are really good to drink in the spring when you have seasonal allergies,” she said. “But they’re also super filling – way more filling than the kale or spinach you could buy at the store.”

Every part of the dandelion flower is edible, Staudt said, and the flowers add a “really lovely sweetness to the honey.”

“Any green part of the plant is a bit more bitter, so if you want to keep that bitterness out of your tea, you can just remove the floral part to use it,” she said. “And a lot of people like to cook with it too.”

Staudt said ingesting dandelion is “wonderful medicine” for the liver.

For Childs, education within the partnership is good for both sides as well as the land.

“All the neighboring communities around us – we are them, and they are us,” Childs said. “We’re just blessed to be guardians of all these special parents – because that’s what they are, plants and nature, is just an extension of us. They’re just vessels that the Creator uses to do His will.”

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Young Master Brewery launches new line of highballs inspired by Asian flavors https://ideals-house.com/young-master-brewery-launches-new-line-of-highballs-inspired-by-asian-flavors/ Mon, 30 May 2022 10:20:44 +0000 https://ideals-house.com/young-master-brewery-launches-new-line-of-highballs-inspired-by-asian-flavors/ One of Hong Kong’s most popular craft breweries, Young Master Brewer, has launched a new product line that expands outside of its original line of craft beers. The new release, HigherThan, features three highball-style ready-to-drink cocktails incorporated with classic Asian flavors that are just as fun, relaxed and free-spirited as the Young Master brand identity. […]]]>

One of Hong Kong’s most popular craft breweries, Young Master Brewer, has launched a new product line that expands outside of its original line of craft beers. The new release, HigherThan, features three highball-style ready-to-drink cocktails incorporated with classic Asian flavors that are just as fun, relaxed and free-spirited as the Young Master brand identity.

Photo: Courtesy of Young Master

Iron Goddess Tea Whiskey Highball is the brewery’s version of the beloved Chinese tea and whiskey combination. Blending Royal Grade Iron Goddess Tea with Scottish Highland Whiskey, this timeless combo creates a flavor profile full of deep, earthy notes and has a floral, aromatic scent.

Young Master's Higherthan Collection Salted Lime Highball
Photo: Courtesy of Young Master

Inspired by salty lime soda, a typical Hong Kong cha chaan teng drink, the Salted Lime Highball takes salted limes and combines them with cane sugar and organic vodka. Together, this crushable highball has an addictive flavor with a refreshing minerality that leaves you wanting more.

Young Master Mala Mule Highball Cocktail
Photo: Courtesy of Young Master

Completing the trio of highball cocktails, the Mala Mule features organic vodka, fresh ginger, lime, cane sugar and a selection of Sichuan spices. Starting out sweet, this highball rocks you with its lime and ginger flavors, but as the name suggests, this highball has a light kick towards the end thanks to those tongue-tingling mala spices.

Now available for purchase on line and at select locations such as Marketplace by Jasons, the HigherThan line will set you back $120 for a six-pack (two cans of each flavor), $240 for a 12-pack (four cans of each flavor), and $480 for a 24 -pack (eight cans of each flavor). The cocktails will also debut in Singapore in June and later this summer in the United States.

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The best rice balls for Dragon Boat Festival 2022

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Ask the Master Gardener: Clematis Plants Hardy Enough to Grow in Brainerd – Brainerd Dispatch https://ideals-house.com/ask-the-master-gardener-clematis-plants-hardy-enough-to-grow-in-brainerd-brainerd-dispatch/ Sun, 29 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://ideals-house.com/ask-the-master-gardener-clematis-plants-hardy-enough-to-grow-in-brainerd-brainerd-dispatch/ Dear Master Gardener: I’m confused. I would like to plant clematis flowers and I see them growing in Brainerd’s gardens. But everything I’ve read about them says they’re not hardy in our zone 3. How can that be? Another variant of the Clematis plant, the Vancouver Starry Night.Contributed / Jennifer Knutson Answer: Maybe a little […]]]>

Dear Master Gardener: I’m confused. I would like to plant clematis flowers and I see them growing in Brainerd’s gardens. But everything I’ve read about them says they’re not hardy in our zone 3. How can that be?

Another variant of the Clematis plant, the Vancouver Starry Night.

Contributed / Jennifer Knutson

Answer: Maybe a little information about Clematis can help you. There are three types of clematis and they differ from each other in how and when they bloom and how they are pruned. Type 1 flowers in the spring on old growth, with buds forming the year before they flower. Therefore, they should be pruned immediately after flowering and before bud formation in July. Type 1 clematis are generally not hardy to zone 3 and are not recommended for our climate. Type 2 produces flower buds on old wood (last year) and new wood (this year). It is then divided into two flowering periods (May/June on old wood and September on new wood) and continuous flowering periods (June to September). Miss Bateman and Nelly Moser are examples of Type 2 two-color clematis. These should be pruned between flushes and only lightly. Examples of continuous bloomers are Dr. Ruppel and the President. Type 3 clematis blooms on new growth and blooms continuously, from July to September. They are usually pruned to the ground each fall or early spring, leaving only the lowest buds to encourage new growth in the spring. Examples of type 3 are the very hardy and popular purple Jackmanii and Madame Julia Correvon. Type 3 clematis will likely perform best in zone 3.

Yes, many varieties of clematis are listed in zones 4-9, but many zone 4 growers do well here, especially those flowering on new wood, as buds that need to overwinter can easily freeze. . Trust your local nurseries to stock only hardy varieties. A Clematis vine requires a structure – a trellis, a fence, a post – on which to climb, although sometimes people leave some crawling on the ground as a ground cover. The old advice of growing clematis is that they like warm tops and cool feet, which means they like their tops in the sun and their roots kept cool with moisture and mulch. An eastern or southern exposure with some midday shade works well.
Clematis is Minnesota’s showiest vine with flowers ranging in size from 1 to 5 inches and comes in colors ranging from pale white and yellow to bright red and dark purple. There is even a beautiful native white clematis, Clematis virginiana (commonly known as Virgin’s Bower) for those who prefer the natives. It is aromatic, hardy to zone 3, blooms August through September, and produces attractive seed heads.

Dear Master Gardener: I was at a friend’s house and asked him about a shrub I had never seen before. He said it’s a New Jersey tea shrub. What can you tell me?

Answer: New Jersey tea (Ceanothus americanus) is a native shrub found in highland grasslands and savannahs. It is low growing and rounded in shape and usually does not exceed 2 feet in Minnesota. It is suitable for a traditional landscape, a wildlife garden or on a steep slope. If planted 2 or 3 feet apart it forms a pretty low hedge. The plant has glossy leaves and in midsummer is covered with showy clusters of white flowers. Not only are the flowers beautiful, but they attract a wide range of pollinators, including bees and butterflies. New Jersey tea thrives in rich, well-drained soil and the deep taproot makes it very drought tolerant once established. Plant it in full sun to partial sun. It blooms on new growth, like a herbaceous perennial.

On a historical note, it was very popular during the Revolutionary War period to use the leaves as a substitute for imported tea. Additionally, the Chippewas of Minnesota used the roots mixed with water to treat coughs.

Dear Master Gardener: When can I plant tuberous begonia and caladium tubers in open ground?

Answer: Tuberous begonias and caladiums are excellent plants for the shade garden and can be planted in the ground as soon as nighttime temperatures are above 50 degrees. They are very sensitive to cold temperatures. Plant tuberous begonia tubers, which are shaped like a small brown bowl with the hollow side up. For best results, plant the tubers in pots first and let them sprout before putting them in the garden. Then plant them in the garden about five inches apart and cover them with an inch of soil. Plant the tops of the caladium bulbs 1-1/2 to 2 inches below the surface with the eyes pointing up.

Dear Master Gardener: My friend had beautiful lavender flowers in her cutting garden last summer that looked like little roses. What could they be?

Answer: It looks like Eustoma, commonly called Lisianthus, which are delicate and elegant flowers that look like small roses. They are grown as an annual in Minnesota. Lisianthus hybrids are long-stemmed flowers that come in lavender, dark purple, various shades of pink, and white. They should be planted in moist, well-drained soil rich in organic matter, in full sun and in an area protected from the wind. Wait to plant them until after the last frost date (after Memorial weekend). They are very long-lasting cut flowers that can last two to three weeks in a vase. It is one of the most elegant flowers, but unfortunately one of the most difficult to grow. Buy them as plants from a garden center as they are very difficult to grow from seed and require seven months to flower. They can also be difficult to find. If you are growing Lisianthus as a cut flower, singles are better than doubles for cut flowers.

You can get your garden questions answered by calling the new Master Gardener Helpline at 218-824-1068 and leaving a message. A master gardener will call you back. Or, email me at umnmastergardener@gmail.com and I’ll reply in the column if space permits.

The University of Minnesota Extension Master Gardeners are trained and certified volunteers for the University of Minnesota Extension. The information provided in this column is based on academic research.

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Wheels Up: Executive Regional Airport’s new master plan sets ambitious goals – The Observer https://ideals-house.com/wheels-up-executive-regional-airports-new-master-plan-sets-ambitious-goals-the-observer/ Sat, 28 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ideals-house.com/wheels-up-executive-regional-airports-new-master-plan-sets-ambitious-goals-the-observer/ BY MISTY MILIOTO SPECIAL TO THE OBSERVER RESERVE – Serving Southeast Louisiana and the River Parish business community, the Port of South Louisiana Executive Regional Airport (KAPS) eliminates travel time to and from commercial airports in New Orleans and Baton Rouge. The airport accommodates small, medium and large business jet operations, and it is the […]]]>

BY MISTY MILIOTO

SPECIAL TO THE OBSERVER

RESERVE – Serving Southeast Louisiana and the River Parish business community, the Port of South Louisiana Executive Regional Airport (KAPS) eliminates travel time to and from commercial airports in New Orleans and Baton Rouge. The airport accommodates small, medium and large business jet operations, and it is the only airport in the region that can support the future overflow of Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport. (MSY).

Today, a new master plan, the first since St. John the Baptist Parish transferred KAPS to the port in 2012, lays the foundation for the airport’s growth and prosperity over the next 10-20 years. .

According to Port of South Louisiana CEO Paul Matthews, KAPS is the only regional airport that is not landlocked, allowing for significant growth. “We want to take the next step by becoming multimodal by bringing cargo to the airport,” he says. “Any growth here increases the tax base. When we grow, the region grows.

The port has hired Kutchins & Groh, a company that provides airport planning and management consultancy services to airports, to ensure that the airport’s goals for a successful master plan are met.

“Proper planning for airport growth is key to the success of any airport,” says General Manager George Groh. “The FAA requires an airport master plan – it’s the way forward that guides the development of the airport. The blueprint gives the FAA an understanding of how funding priorities will be needed and used in the future.

For KAPS, the master plan began with an inventory of existing airport facilities and their condition. “A forecast is being developed to look at the projected growth of the region as a whole and how the airport fits into that growth,” Groh said. “Based on the forecast, we can then examine what types of facilities will be needed in the future.”

The master plan started in October 2021 with the facility assessment and some strategy sessions. The work should be completed by the end of this year.

Two groups will meet several times during the project. The technical group is made up of pilots and the community group is made up of professionals from economic development, tourism, education and other sectors. The master planning process allows the airport, community and travelers to participate in the growth of KAPS. “Airports not only serve the aviation community, they are also an engine of activity in the community,” says Groh. “A successful airport needs community support, and the master planning process allows all entities to come together and participate in its planning for the future.”

An ongoing project at KAPS is the development of 10 T-sheds of varying sizes. Most will accommodate single engine aircraft, but four larger units have been added to attract accommodation for larger twin aircraft and others such as a TBM. In the past, hangar rentals were sacrificed to other airports due to lack of space for larger aircraft. With a shortage of hangar space in the state and across the country, pilots are on a waiting list at KAPS to base their aircraft at port facilities. Future plans also include a 1,000 foot runway extension and a new terminal.

KAPS’ growth also allows the port to welcome new industry engine tenants, such as the recent addition of Beacon Aviation, an FAA-certified airframe and powerplant maintenance shop. “This is another improvement that will bring more traffic to the airport that otherwise wouldn’t have been enticed to land here,” Matthews said.

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